ACE 2010 – Workshops

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Association of Canadian Ergonomists
41st Annual Conference
"United by a Common Vision."
October 5-7, 2010
Exhibitor Showcase October 5-6, 2010
Kelowna Coast Capri, Kelowna, BC

Pre Conference Workshops
October 4, 2010

We are pleased to offer a variety of workshops on Monday, October 4, 2010.

The workshops are offered for different levels of experience (Novice, Intermediate, Advanced) and are a full day or a half day in duration. Training is offered for both the general public (e.g. health and safety representatives and committee members, union delegates, engineers, supervisors, foremen, human resource professionals, etc.) and for ergonomists and other health and safety professionals. You may register for the workshops even if you are not attending the conference. ACE reserves the right to cancel any workshop if there is insufficient registrations. If a workshop is cancelled for any reason, The Association of Canadian Ergonomists assumes liability limited to a refund of the workshop fee only.

  • Please note that workshop fees are not included in the full conference registration fee.
  • A special post-conference workshop on the professional certification (CCPE) application process will be held on Thursday, October 7 from 1:30pm - 3:30pm (25.00 members / 50.00 non-members)
  • As a fun option for budding wine connoisseurs, a full day Wine and Spirit Educational Trust "Foundation Course" in wine tasting will be offered on October 3, 2010.

Program Conference Information link

Register on-line

Workshop Schedule

Workshop Room

08:00 - 12:00

13:00 - 17:00

TBA

1. BETTER ACCIDENT INVESTIGATIONS: Understanding and Preventing Human Error

TBA

2. Program Evaluation for Project Managers CANCELLED

TBA

3. Office Ergonomics: Learn to Conduct an Assessment CANCELLED

TBA

4. Ergonomics for an aging workforce CANCELLED

TBA5. Engineering for Ergonomists 6. Ergonomics of Hand-held Power Tools
TBA7. An Introduction to Human Factors in Healthcare: Understanding Errors and Performance Limits 8. Applying Human Factors Principles in Procurement of Products and Services
TBA9. From Evidence to Practice: Implementing Participatory Ergonomics Programs CANCELLED 10. Improving Success of Ergonomics Interventions by Understanding the Barriers for Change
TBA11. New Approaches in Delivering Training: The Challenges of Remote Training CANCELLED 12. Applying BC's Ergonomics Regulation CANCELLED
TBA13. Ergonomic Input Devices and Workstation Accessories – What Works and When

Workshop Descriptions

1. Better Accident Investigations: Understanding and Preventing Human Error

Date and Time: Monday, October 4th, 8:00am to 5:00pm
Level: Intermediate to Advanced

Workshop Outline
Often investigations find human error as a main contributor to accidents. Rather than a conclusion, this should be the starting point of an in depth investigation that will not only determine the various factors that lead to the error, but allow for better design of the equipment, environment, processes, systems and training related to the job tasks involved.
Participants will learn how to systematically investigate for the physical, cognitive/mental and organizational factors that may have contributed to the accident, near miss or unsafe conditions.

Using case studies, participants will develop and rehearse practical skills necessary to conduct investigations such as interviewing, fact gathering, constructing sequence of events diagrams, identifying and analyzing unsafe behaviours, synthesizing contributing factors and providing safety recommendations.

Who Should Attend
The workshop will be of interest to all those interested in developing skill in effectively investigating the causes of accidents, incidents and unsafe conditions in their environment, for example Managers, OHS Committee members, Ergonomists, Accident/Incident Investigators, OHS and Risk Managers, and Injury Prevention Coordinators.

Facilitated by

2. PROGRAM EVALUATION FOR PROJECT MANAGERS

Facilitated by: Jennifer Miller

Date and Time: Monday, October 4th, 2010 - 8:00am to 5:00pm

Workshop Outline
The aim of this workshop is to develop an understanding of program evaluation and work towards competency as a novice evaluator through a project-based approach.

Evaluation is an important activity for many programs and/or larger projects but can be a daunting task for the busy project manager and/or consultant. Through this interactive and fun workshop, participants will gain an understanding of the different types of evaluation methods available and begin to develop a logic model and evaluation framework for their own project(s). Participants will benefit if they come prepared with a project example of their own to which they can apply this workshop's learnings.

At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to:
a) explain the importance of program evaluation;
b) describe the difference between process and outcome evaluation;

  • process evaluation: conducted during the implementation phase of projects/programs with a goal of improving performance;
  • outcome evaluation: conducted at the end of a project to determine the extent to which anticipated outcome were produced (i.e. impact)

c) define the role and key components of the program logic model (inputs, activities, outputs, and outcomes) in program planning and evaluation;
d) develop a draft program logic model for their project;
e) begin to think about indicators and methods for measuring outcomes; and
f) understand strategies to share findings/results of evaluation (i.e. knowledge translation).

Who Should Attend

  • Beginner-Intermediate Level
  • Ergonomists
  • Health and Safety professionals
  • Project managers and/or consultants on larger projects
  • General Public

3. Office Ergonomics: Learn to Conduct an Assessment

Facilitated by: Shona Anderson of Anderson Ergonomics Consulting Inc.

Date and Time: Monday, October 4th, 2010 - 8:00am to 5:00pm

Workshop Outline
You can't fix what you don't know is broken. Office ergonomics assessments are a critical step to resolving ergonomics issues in the office environment. There are many tools available to perform office ergonomic assessments, and the end-user will always benefit most and "buy-in" more readily to a simple, effective approach. In this full-day course, participants will learn how to conduct a basic Office Ergonomics Assessment for employees within their own organization. Key learnings include:

  • Understanding the risk factors which contribute to Back, Repetitive Strain Injuries and visual discomfort in the workplace.
  • Understanding how those risk factors can be controlled by proper Office Workstation Set-up.
  • Understanding the elements necessary to implement a successful Ergonomics process in the office work environment.
  • The development and application of an individual office workstation ergonomics assessment checklist
  • Understanding those Ergonomic Products which are most appropriate for use in the office environment and how to develop a product standards list.

Workshop Outline
1. The risk factors which contribute to Back, Repetitive Strain Injuries and visual discomfort in the office workplace.

The course will discuss the types and stages of injuries to the body from work-related activities as well as some home activities. Related to the back, the course will discuss the back, injuries and the importance of maintaining the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar curves in the spine. Additionally participants will learn how stressors such as sitting and lifting contribute to discomfort and possible injury to the back. Proper bending and moving both at the workplace and at home to reduce the potential for injury will be discussed.

Related to the upper body, the course will discuss the "neutral position" of the entire body and the types of work activities that can cause discomfort, such as mousing or typing improperly, reaching for items on the desk, etc.

The course will also talk about the factors associated with eyestrain, such as glare, monitor height and distance, and monitor type.

2. Understanding how those risk factors can be controlled by proper Office Workstation Set-up.

The course will then relate the risk factors discussed in the first section to the office work environment and will discuss proper methods for computer and workstation set-up.

3. Understanding the elements necessary to implement a successful Ergonomics process in the office work environment.

The course will get participants to discuss and determine the elements necessary for an Ergonomics process of assessments and education to be successful. Elements such as resources, management commitment, and employee education will be discussed at length.

4. The development and application of an individual office workstation ergonomics assessment checklist

Participants will develop their own ergonomics assessment checklist from the material that has been discussed and compare it to others. Participants will then use their checklist to evaluate a number of different workstations on video as well as interview each other to understand the entire assessment process.

5. Understanding of appropriate Ergonomic Products and how to develop a product standards list

Participants will be shown a number of different products and asked to evaluate them based on given criteria. They will develop a list of products which they can take back to their offices to use as a standard.

Participants use breakout exercises, case studies, question and answer sessions, checklists and examples to gain a comprehensive understanding of how to improve Ergonomics in their workplace.

A full manual will be provided for each participant.

Who Should Attend

  • Safety Professionals / Occupational Health Nurses
  • Office Administrators
  • Office Managers / Supervisory Staff IT and Computer Specialists
  • Human Resource Professionals
  • Facilities Managers

4. ERGONOMICS FOR AN AGING WORKFORCE

Facilitated by: Jonathon Tyson

Date and Time: Monday, October 4th, 2010 - 8:00am to 5:00pm

Workshop Outline
The aim of this workshop is to present and discuss the needs of the aging worker and how aging-related changes can impact the healthy, safety and performance of workers. To provide participants with a set of design guidelines and principles that they can use to help ensure existing and future workplaces are designed with the needs of the aging worker in mind. To demonstrate techniques for simulating specific age related decrements that can be used to evaluate specific designs and / or educate workplace parties about the impacts of various age related changes.

As the population of North America ages and world wide competition increases many organizations will need to not only retain their workers well past the historical retirement age of 65, but also look to hire older workers. They will also have to deal with workers who are no longer required to retire at the age of 65 and those who no longer can retire when they thought due to the recent economic slowdown.
These 'aging workers' pose a real and significant challenge to ergonomists as they will need to consider how aging impacts capabilities and performance and what a workplace should look like for workers who are 70, 80 or even 90 years old. It is becoming vital that workplaces address both the physical and organizational design related issues that can negatively affect performance and the health and safety of older workers, and ergonomists should be leading this change.

In this workshop, participants will learn:
a) what is the aging worker
b) how aging can affect us (physiological, cognitive, anthropometric, sensory, etc.)
c) what we know about aging workers in the workplace

  • the healthy and active aging worker
  • psychosocial needs of aging workers
  • changes to physical and sensory capabilities with aging

From there participants will be provided with an opportunity to simulate various age related decrements in order determine how these reduced capabilities can affect performance, health and safety.

Workshop participants will work together to develop a set of guidelines and principles for creating workplaces that not only accommodate aging workers, but also help these workers thrive. The guidelines identified by workshop participants will be compared to a pre-prepared set of design guidelines that will be provided to participants.

Workshop participants will then work in groups on selected case studies to determine: (a) the issues that need to be addressed to meet the needs of the aging worker and (b) the solutions that could be implemented to address the identified issues.

Finally, a suggested process for helping workplaces recognize and implement a process that addresses the design needs of aging workers will be presented.

Who Should Attend
Audience: Ergonomists & Public (Human Resources, Mangers, Occupational Health & Safety Professionals)

5. ENGINEERING FOR ERGONOMISTS

Facilitated by: Stephen Bao, Ph.D., CCPE, CPE
Washington State Department of Labor and Industries

Date and Time: Monday, October 4th, 2010 - 8:00am to 12:00pm

Workshop Outline
As practicing ergonomists, we offer helps to industries in order to improve their job efficiency, work conditions and total productivity. A good understanding of some common engineering methods is crucial for us to identify the causes of problems, facilitate the development of feasible and effective solutions and ease our communications with engineers of our customers. This is especially important for ergonomists who were trained in other fields rather than engineering.

The objectives of this workshop are to familiarize non-engineering ergonomists and safety practitioners with some basic engineering product design and manufacturing procedures, teach them some product design guidelines which can effectively reduce/eliminate musculoskeletal risk factors, and provide them with some examples of feasible workplace ergonomics that can be used by manufacturing engineers to reduce musculoskeletal hazards. Participants will have opportunities to apply the learned knowledge in analyzing a product, and practicing a product usability evaluation procedure in order to identify product design problems and propose improvement suggestions. Video-recorded manufacturing operations will also be viewed and analyzed by participants. Problems and solutions to the manufacturing process will be discussed.

Who Should Attend
This workshop is designed for ergonomists and other safety practitioners who are not originally trained in engineering. It will also be beneficial to students who plan to practice ergonomics in workplaces to reduce work-related musculoskeletal disorders and improve job efficiency.

6. ERGONOMICS OF HAND-HELD POWER TOOLS

Facilitated by: Stephen Bao

Date and Time: Monday, October 4th, 2010 - 1:00pm to 5:00pm

Workshop Outline
Hand-held power tools are used widely in industries to help make jobs possible, easier and faster. Their applications in industries also make our products more consistent. However, many work-related musculoskeletal disorders have been reported to be associated with the use of hand-held power tools, such as the carpal tunnel syndromes, and hand-arm vibration syndrome.

The objectives of the workshop are to give participants an introduction to the various types of hand-held power tools, an understanding of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSD) hazards associated with these tools and tool design features related to the WMSD risk factors and hands-on knowledge on risk reduction considerations in workplaces. Typical tools covered in this workshop include grinders, drills, percussive tools, screwdrivers, and electric, impact and impulse nutrunners. Musculoskeletal disorder risk factors will be discussed with relation to tool designs, workstation layout, product designs, and job features. Tool samples will be brought to the workshop so that participants can view and play with them. This will give the workshop participants hands-on knowledge about the various tool features that are discussed.

Who Should Attend
Participants can be ergonomics practitioners who conduct workplace assessment and make solution suggestions about hand tools, engineers who design jobs and select tools, as well as students who have the desire to pursue a future career in improving work conditions at manufacturing or maintenance facilities. This workshop should be suitable for people with various levels of experience in ergonomics applications.

7. AN INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN FACTORS IN HEALTHCARE: UNDERSTANDING ERRORS AND PERFORMANCE LIMITS

Facilitator: Tony Easty

Date & Time: Monday, October 4, 2010: 8:00am to 12:00pm, Level: Beginner, Language: English

This workshop will provide an introduction to the key principles of human factors and human performance as they relate to a safe healthcare environment. Topics will include human cognitive abilities and human performance in complex clinical settings. Practical examples will be given of errors in healthcare and other spheres, and the underlying causes will be reviewed. The importance of hazard reporting and incident reporting will also be discussed.

Who should attend: This workshop is intended for people working in healthcare who are concerned with safety and error reduction in clinical environments, and no prior knowledge of human factors principles is required.

8. Applying Human Factors Principles in Procurement of Products and Services

Facilitated by: Allison Lamsdale

Date and Time: Monday, October 4th, 2010 - 1:00pm to 5:00pm

Workshop Outline
The aim of this workshop is to describe systematic and collaborative approaches to procurement that incorporates Human Factors principles to guide selection of products and services in complex socio-technical industries.

Research has shown the benefit of Human Factors evaluations in product selection; however, many complex socio-technical industries either lack resources or a formal process to integrate Human Factors in the procurement process. How to incorporate Human Factors into procurement in the public and private sectors and creating buy-in within the organization for this process will be discussed using examples from the healthcare and power generation domains.

Who Should Attend

  • Beginner to Intermediate
  • Ergonomists interested in procurement activities & General public

9. From Evidence to Practice: Implementing Participatory Ergonomics Programs

Facilitated by: Kiera Keown, Dwayne Van Eerd, Trevor King, Judy Village

Date and Time: Monday, October 4th, 2010 - 8:00am to 12:00pm

Workshop Outline
The goal of this half-day workshop is to provide participants with tools and strategies to introduce and implement participatory ergonomics into their workplace.
Organizers will present evidence on the effectiveness of participatory ergonomics (PE) and the key barriers and facilitators to implementing successful PE programs. Drawing on the international literature about participatory ergonomics and experiences in implementing PE programs, we will provide guidance on how to overcome the main barriers to initiating and implementing a PE intervention. Participants will be provided with evidence based tools and resources to assist with implementation in their workplace. We will use examples from the literature and practice and refer to these tools and resources and how to best use them. Practical experience on PE implementation from educationally influential ergonomists will be presented. We will provide detailed information about the common elements of a PE program: guiding participants through the steps of creating teams and involving the correct people, defining responsibilities, making decisions, and providing training. This information will allow participants to feel confident implementing a PE program in their workplaces. The structure of the workshop will include presentations as well as small group activities which will allow for brainstorming of additional implementation strategies. We will encourage participants to discuss their unique situations to better address potential barriers encountered.


Who Should Attend

  • OHS managers
  • Engineers
  • Supervisors
  • OHS committee members
  • General Public
  • Beginner Level

10. Improving Success of Ergonomics Interventions by Understanding the Barriers for Change

Facilitated by: Judy Village

Date and Time: Monday, October 4th, 2010 - 1:00pm to 5:00pm

Workshop Outline
This workshop will explore reasons why ergonomic interventions are sometimes not effective within organizations. The barriers to implementation of effective ergonomics interventions are often influenced by the knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and readiness for change of workers and supervisors. For example, supervisors may believe that nothing can be done to reduce musculoskeletal injuries, or workers may believe that there is too little time and money to tackle problems. Implementing change is difficult with these barriers. The question then is: how do we determine what these attitudes and beliefs are within an organization?

The stage of change model will be explained, which suggests that people making changes (including implementing ergonomic interventions) progress through a series of six predictable stages. Further, they will only adopt ergonomic interventions when their positive attitudes and beliefs about the intervention outweigh their negative ones. Providing the "wrong" solution for a particular stage can result in a failed intervention. For example, providing a lifting device for workers who do not feel there is a risk of injury will likely result in the device not being used. The workshop will provide examples where stage-matched, or "tailored" ergonomic interventions have yielded more positive outcomes than those that are not tailored. In the workshop, a survey tool will be shared (based on Village, 2008, Whysall, et al 2005, and Cox and Cheyne, 2000) that identifies stage of change and also incorporates the safety climate checklist. The safety climate checklist identifies the "mood" of an organization. Both stage of change and safety climate can provide a baseline understanding of the knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and readiness for change within an organization. This knowledge can be used to implement improved ergonomics or occupational health and safety programs. Results of the survey tool from workers and supervisors in the road building construction industry will be shared to illustrate how this can help tailor further occupational health, safety and ergonomics initiatives.

The goal of this workshop is for participants to understand how and why they may want to measure the attitudes and beliefs of workers and supervisors in order to improve the success of their ergonomic interventions.

Who Should Attend

  • Intermediate-to-Advanced
  • Ergonomists and Occupational Health and Safety Professionals

11. New Approaches in Delivering Training: The Challenges of Remote Training

Facilitated by: Audrey Lalumiere

Date and Time: Monday, October 4th, 2010 - 8:00am to 12:00pm

Workshop Outline
This workshop will discuss the challenges and opportunities of remote training, an alternative to formal training methods. Participants will explore the foundations of efficient training and learn how to enhance interactivity while using these means.

Providing training to employees is an important part of a business management system. However, the cost of training is very high and businesses must be innovative in their ways of providing such training. Online courses offer an alternative to in-room training and costs related to travel time and fees are dramatically decreased.

This workshop will explore the opportunities and challenges of new ways of providing training while still being efficient. The presenters will share with the participants their experience of a blended learning solution created by General Electric Learning Center. A self-paced on-line course that is followed by a series of instructor-led Web conference calls has been developed and training has been provided using this new approach for the last 3 years.

During this workshop, participants will explore the foundations of efficient training and will discuss the challenges related to using new approaches in delivering training. What are the difficulties of on-line courses and Web-conference calls? What are the tools that are available to ensure that people remain focused during the training? How is it possible to have interactive sessions using these new technologies?

Tools and means for delivering efficient training will be discussed and demonstrated. Benefits of these new approaches will also be identified.
At the end of this workshop, participants should have a better understanding of the necessary conditions to ensure that remote training is worthwhile and efficient and that it may be a good alternative to traditional training methods.

Who Should Attend
This is an intermediate level workshop and will be of interest to all those involved with employee training

12. APPLYING BC'S ERGONOMICS REGULATIONS

Facilitated by: Peter Goyert, Chloe Eaton, Gina Vahlas

Date and Time: Monday, October 4th, 2010 - 1:00pm to 5:00pm

Workshop Outline
This workshop will describe the role of WorkSafeBC in promoting workplace health and safety with an emphasis on what to expect during an inspection and how to comply. We will introduce the Ergonomics (MSI) Requirements including an explanation of risk identification, assessment and control. Participants will learn how to apply various risk assessment tools, including WorkSafeBC's Worksheets 'A' and 'B' and push/pull, lift and carry (Snook and Ciriello) Tables. There will be an opportunity to practice using these tools with video case studies from different types of work environments.

Who Should Attend

  • Beginner Level
  • Office Administrators
  • HR and Safety professionals
  • Safety committee members
  • Supervisors and front-line workers

13. Ergonomic Input Devices and Workstation Accessories - What Works and When

Facilitated by: Michael Craggs

Date and Time: Monday, October 4th, 2010 - 8:00am to 12:00pm

Workshop Outline
The aim of this workshop is to enhance attendee's ability to adequately match their ergonomic assessments with the products most likely to address each designated problem / issue in them; to help attendees discriminate between effective vs. cosmetic features in common ergonomic products, and so make better recommendations after assessments.

Every year, hundreds of new ergonomic products are launched and many others are discontinued, making it virtually impossible to keep current on what is available. Regardless of the amount of research and design theory backing any given product, 'real-world' shortcomings which can reduce or outweigh the intended ergonomic benefits often make themselves apparent after deployment.

Michael's years of experience in working with ergonomic professionals across Canada and as a liaison with manufacturers have given him a unique perspective on the 'true' effectiveness of popular ergonomic products. Join him in an open, interactive, advanced discussion that compares the theory behind individual product designs (how risk factors are addressed) to their effectiveness in practice (i.e. case studies).

Feedback from attendees is an integral part of this presentation, as Michael will lead an open and frank discussion of "What Works, and When" and the real 'pros' and 'cons' of popular ergonomic input devices and workstation accessories. Get 'hands on' with the most popular ergonomic input devices and accessories currently available during the interactive portion of the workshop.

Let him know what works (and what doesn't) and he will convey this information directly to the manufacturers in his role as a manufacturer's representative in Canada (researching, marketing, designing and developing ergonomic products).

Workshop Agenda:

1) Case Study Conundrums:
" Audience indicates problems they have encountered in the past
" Solutions will be provided throughout the workshop

2) Powerpoint Presentations:
" The wide range of ergonomic products available
" Explanation of the concepts driving the manufacturers and the design choices they make
" Discussion of tools and methodologies for analyzing the potential applications and benefits (and limitations and drawbacks) of any given so-called 'ergonomic' product
" Discussion of what ergonomic features are merely mirages
" Glimpses into what's coming, e.g. new areas of product design and possibilities

3) Conquering Conundrums:
" Interspersed throughout the presentation the answers to the Case Studies in 1)
" Follow-up questions and an opportunity for potential concerns / feedback from the delegates
" Content from these discussions of case studies will be taken back to the manufacturers

4) Interactive Activities:
" Breaking up into discussion 'pods' to get 'hands on' with the actual products and an opportunity to compare them in real workstations
" Interactive activities applying the techniques and knowledge presented to ensure that these newly found skills are used and will be retained for when they are needed in the future.

Who Should Attend
Ergonomic Professionals who perform assessments and are required to identify or recommend ergonomic products as part of their assessment.

Pre-Conference Workshop Rates

Please note that workshop fees are not included in the full conference registration fee.

All workshops include lunch served from 12pm to 1pm.

Full Day Workshop of Two Half Day Workshops: rate included lunch served 12pm to 1pm.

All rates in $CDN

ACE Members

Non ACE Members

Students

Early (by September 8, 2010)

$250.00

$299.00

$150.00

Late (after September 8, 2010)

$287.50

$344.00

$172.50

Workshops that do not meet the minimum number of registrations by September 15 will be cancelled. Please ensure that you register as soon as possible.

1/2 Day Workshop (am or pm): rate includes lunch served 12pm to 1pm.

All rates in $CDN

ACE Members

Non ACE Members

Students

Early (by September 8, 2010)

$150.00

$199.00

$100.00

Late (after September 8, 2010)

$172.50

$229.00

$115.00

Workshops that do not meet the minimum number of registrations by September 15 will be cancelled. Please ensure that you register as soon as possible.

register on-line