ACE 2013 – Workshops

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Association of Canadian Ergonomists
44th Annual Conference
From Sea to Sky: Expanding the Reach of Ergonomics
October 8-10, 2013

Pre-conference workshops: October 7, 2013
Whistler Conference Centre, Whistler, BC

Pre Conference Workshops 
October 7, 2013

We are pleased to offer a variety of workshops on Monday, October 7, 2013

The workshops are offered for different levels of experience (Novice, Intermediate, Advanced) and are a full day or a half day in duration. Training is offered for both the general public (e.g. health and safety representatives and committee members, union delegates, engineers, supervisors, foremen, human resource professionals, etc.) and for ergonomists and other health and safety professionals. You may register for the workshops even if you are not attending the conference. ACE reserves the right to cancel any workshop if there is insufficient registrations. If a workshop is cancelled for any reason, The Association of Canadian Ergonomists assumes liability limited to a refund of the workshop fee only.

  • Please note that workshop fees are not included in the full conference registration fee.

Register on-line

Workshop Information

 


Workshop Schedule 

Workshop Room

08:00 - 12:00

13:00 - 17:00

TBA

CANCELLED - 1. Practical Safety Risk Management Training – From Hazard Identification to Effective Safety Action

 

CANCELLED - 2. Getting Proactive – Approaches Tools and Metrics for Integrating Ergonomics into Work System Design

 

CANCELLED - 2. Getting Proactive – Approaches Tools and Metrics for Integrating Ergonomics into Work System Design

  3. Behaviour Change Workshop
 

4. Sampling Strategy for Ergonomists: who when and how long to measure

  5. Let’s talk about office ergonomics – points beyond today’s guidelines

6. Implementing the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Ergonomics Credit for New Construction

  CANCELLED - 7. Gaining Insight from Organizational Stakeholders: Using Qualitative Interviewing in Ergonomics Research

8. Introduction to Human Vibration - ADDDDD

  CANCELLED - 7. Gaining Insight from Organizational Stakeholders: Using Qualitative Interviewing in Ergonomics Research

8. Introduction to Human Vibration - ADDDDD

 

Workshop Descriptions

CANCELLED - 1. Practical Safety Risk Management Training – From Hazard Identification to Effective Safety Action

Date and Time:  Monday, October 7, 2013,  Full Day

Level:  Beginner to Intermediate  Language: English

Workshop Outline

Everybody in a work environment should be a risk manager, either as a legal obligation or because their safety culture demands it. Routinely, often by default, the role of the risk assessor falls to the staff ergonomist. While much has been written academically about how to conduct the risk management process, managers, ergonomists and other designated personnel often find themselves frustrated when trying to do it in their real world setting.
Drawing on the knowledge and skills of two experienced practitioner, this workshop is constructed around skills development and adult learning principles. As such, the focus is on participant involvement, making use of case studies and facilitated discussions. The following topics will be covered:

  • Proactive and Reactive Hazard Identification – recognizing those conditions that can lead to harm
  • Investigations – recognizing the critical link between investigations and risk management; ensuring a proper understanding of factors that account for the hazards, and that need to be addressed
  • Practical Risk Assessment – what safety issues do I need to worry about first
  • Developing effective action plans – from buffing the sphere to transforming the organization
  • Assessing Return on Investment – how can you establish that you have made a difference?

Target Audience: The workshop will be of interest to all those interested in developing skill in effectively assessing and managing risks, for example Managers, OHS Committee members, Ergonomists, Safety Management Systems managers, OHS and Risk Managers, and Injury Prevention Coordinators.

Facilitated by: Maury Hill, MASc (Ergonomics / Human Factors) Mary Louise Gifford, MASc (Health Ergonomics)

 

CANCELLED - 2. Getting Proactive – Approaches Tools and Metrics for Integrating Ergonomics into Work System Design

Date and Time: Monday, October 7, 2013, Full Day 

Level: All Levels   Language: English

Workshop Outline

This workshop will provide a framework and evidence for why and how to integrate human factors (HF, or ergonomics) more proactively into the design of production systems to prevent injuries and optimize operator performance. This is based on our current research with Manufacturing Engineering teams at BlackBerry®.  Several tools and techniques, adapted for HF from fields such as operations research and industrial engineering, will be demonstrated and discussed to illustrate how ergonomists can learn more about the design process in their organization, and the strategic business goals of their management teams. The use of process maps can help indicate for ergonomists and others in the organization the best approaches for integrating HF into production systems design. Several other adapted industrial engineering tools will be demonstrated, such as a HF-failure mode and effects analysis, and a HF-design for assembly scorecard. We will illustrate the process of how these tools were customized in participation with Manufacturing Engineers at BlackBerry®, and led to required HF targets in production design processes. The workshop will be interactive, with short exercises for participants and discussions among the group.

In the afternoon, the workshop will shift its focus to ways of assessing the level of HF integration in an organization.  Have you ever wondered “How will I know when the HF we are doing is World Class”?  Have you had people ask “How is that HF stuff going? My boss would like to know”?  We have heard these questions from managers or supervisors but have yet to find an off-the shelf, comprehensive tool to assess the level of HF integration and performance in an organization.  Throughout the afternoon session we will explore why it is important to measure HF integration, the various approaches that might be taken to measure integration, and the areas of influence for HF within the organisation. Participants will be introduced to a new tool called “HFIT” - the Human Factors Integration Tool. The audit-like tool can be used to indicate how close your organization is to achieving World Class HF integration, and, hopefully, inspire actions for continuous improvement. The final discussion of the day will cover some of the lessons learned, facilitators, and barriers to integrating HF in design processes within organizations.  (Please note that the presenters will be audio recording the afternoon discussion about measuring HF integration.  This information will be used to improve the tool to better suit user needs.  All contributions will remain anonymous.)

Target Audience: Ergonomists, Engineers, Managers, OHS Personnel

Facilitated by: W. Patrick Neumann, Michael Greig & Judy Village
Human Factors Engineering Lab, Dept of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering,
Ryerson University
 

3. Behaviour Change Workshop

Date and Time: Monday, October 7, 2013, - 8:00am to 12:00pm

Level: All Levels  Language: English

Workshop Outline

Understanding the drivers behind health-related behaviours has been a challenge for many decades and a number of explanatory models have been developed. The Theory of Planned Behaviour (Ajzen, 1991; Ajzen & Madden, 1996) is one of the most widely used models, and whilst the majority of studies fall within the field of ‘health’, it has been used within ‘health & safety’ in relation to driver behaviour (Elliot, Armitage & Baughan, 2003), wearing of protective equipment (Quine, Rutter & Arnold 2001), food hygiene (Clayton & Griffith 2008), and manual handling (Johnson & Hall, 2005). 
A fairly simple model, it suggests that intention to undertake a particular behaviour is influenced by three main issues, namely: attitude towards that behaviour; the subjective norms (pervading culture) in relation to the behaviour; and the degree to which an individual feels able to exert control over their behaviours. Drawing on applied and fundamental research from psychology, this workshop will support attendees to understand the drivers of behaviour and use this understanding to improve the success of their workplace interventions.

Goals:

  • provide up to date theory about Behaviour Change models from evidenced based psychology
  • apply these models to the workplace
  • give attendees the opportunity to apply this knowledge to issues in their workplaces/practice

Target Audience: Ergonomists and allied professionals

Facilitated by: Dr Claire Williams, Mr Andrew Baird, Prof David Sheffield 

 

4. Sampling Strategy for Ergonomists: who when and how long to measure

Date and Time: Monday, October 7, 2013, - 1:00pm to 5:00pm

Level: Intermediate  Language: English

Workshop Outline

Have you ever had the experience of going to a worksite for an ergonomics assessment and the workers say: “You should have been here yesterday when we had 14 orders to fill and then a giant spill... Today is too easy!”

When using observational methods, how should professionals decide whom to measure, for how long, and when? How do we know our measurements reflect the ‘true’ scenario?

Assessment of posture, manual materials handling, and vibration are critical to modern ergonomics practice. Whether we want to check for compliance with an exposure limit, or test for changes before and after an intervention, ergonomic measurements are critical to quantifying working conditions. For practical reasons, observation and checklist methods are most often used by ergonomists in the field.

However, there is very little information for practicing professionals on whom they should measure, for how long, and how many times. This course will explain the challenges and strategies of planning measurements using exposure variability as a framework.

Learning Objectives
At the end of the course, attendees will be able to:

  1. Describe the sources of variability in physical exposure measures like posture and manual materials handling
  2. Use existing information to estimate variability
  3. Describe the challenges of highly-precise measurement
  4. Balance the trade-off of time and cost with measurement precision
  5. List strategies to get the most measurement precision out of existing resources
  6. Draft sampling plans that are efficient and informative

Who Should Attend: practicing OHS professionals, with an emphasis on ergonomists. This is an intermediate level workshop. Attendees in this course should:

  1. Have experience with field-based, observation-based ergonomic assessments
  2. Have familiarity with observation/checklist methods such as RULA, REBA, PEO, OWAS

Facilitated by:  Catherine Trask, PhD, University of Saskatchewan

 

 5 . Let’s talk about office ergonomics – points beyond today’s guidelines

Date and Time: Monday, October 7, 2013, 8:00am to 12:00pm

Level: All Levels  Language: English

Workshop Outline

Many of us as practicing ergonomists have done office ergonomics evaluations. We often give our clients recommendations and trainings based on currently available office ergonomics guidelines (e.g. Office Ergonomics: Guidelines for preventing Musculoskeletal Injuries, by WorkSafe NB, How to make your computer workstation fit you, by WorkSafe BC, Guideline on Office Ergonomics, by Canadian Standards Association, etc.) in order to improve musculoskeletal health conditions among office workers. It would be interesting to see how successful we are or sad to learn how unsuccessful we were. Either way the information about our past work in office ergonomics interventions would help us in improving our future ergonomics practices in the office environment.

Just like the rapid advances of computer technology, office equipment and technologies that are used to better the ergonomics of office work and knowledge of ergonomics improvements for office workers are keeping updating. How do many of the new office equipment (e.g. ergo keyboard/mouse, office ball, treadmill workstations, etc.) work, and how many of us have applied some of the new concepts (e.g. using negatively tilt keyboards) in our recommendation and do they really work? These might be some of the questions that many of our ergonomics practitioners have in our minds.

Target Audience: This workshop is designed for ergonomists, kinesiologists, physical therapists and other safety practitioners who practice office ergonomics, and managers who are responsible for the health of office workers. It will also be beneficial to students who plan to practice ergonomics in the office environment.

Facilitated by:  Stephen Bao, Ph.D., CCPE, CPE

 

6. Implementing the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Ergonomics Credit for New Construction

Date and Time: Monday, October 7, 2013, 1:00pm to 5:00pm

Level: Intermediate    Language: English

Workshop Outline

Despite guidance from the United States Green Building Council (USGBC) on the requirements for earning a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) ergonomics credit in the Innovation in Design category, few projects have received the credit. The University of California, Berkeley ergonomics program, Ergonomics@Work, has aligned the ergonomics strategy to those of the USGBC and LEED to achieve the ergonomics credit in several new buildings. This half-day workshop for intermediate ergonomists and associated professionals will teach the steps needed to obtain the credit and offer small group discussion on ways to move the process forward at your location. As a profession it is up to ergonomists to create the road map that incorporates ergonomics into the green building design. The attendees will leave the workshop with the following information: 

1. A general understanding of USGBC and LEED

  • Environmentally responsible buildings that are profitable and healthy places to live and work
  • LEED professionals
  • Assessing building performance and meeting sustainability goals

2. The components of the ergonomics credit for new construction

  • Four steps required to achieve the credit
  • Credit interpretation ruling
  • Developing an ergonomics strategy that links to the USGBC requirements

3. Knowledge of the design team members for a new construction project

  • Roles and responsibilities
  • Ways to get buy-in for ergonomics

4. Ways to develop the supporting documentation

  • Checklists for ergonomics strategy and design elements
  • Pre-approved product lists
  • Workstation evaluations and user survey
  • Narrative

5. Two projects that have received the LEED credit for ergonomics

  • Activities achieved prior, during and after the project
  • Lessons learned
    • Ways the process did not work and how it was handled
    • LEED equivalence

6. How to take the process forward where you work

  • Small group discussion

Target Audience:  Intermediate ergonomists and associated professionals

Facilitated by: Mallory Lynch, Ergonomist, University of California, Berkeley

 
CANCELLED - 7. Gaining Insight from Organizational Stakeholders: Using Qualitative Interviewing in Ergonomics Research

Date and Time: Monday, October 7, 2013, 8:00am to 12:00pm

Level: Intermediate    Language: English

Workshop Outline

This workshop is intended to introduce researchers and practitioners to the topic of qualitative interviewing and qualitative data analysis. In the field of ergonomics the use of qualitative interviewing has gained more popularity as a way of examining contextual factors that influence ergonomic interventions. Effectively conducted qualitative interviews with organizational stakeholders can provide us with critical data to understand organizational context and potentially improve intervention outcomes. This session will help participants answer questions such as, “How can I better understand workers’ and managers’ perspectives?” “What information can qualitative interviews provide that other methods cannot?” “How do I carry out a qualitative interview?” “How do I analyze the data from qualitative interviews?” This workshop will be divided into two parts: the first portion of the workshop will focus on qualitative interviewing and the last hour will introduce participants to the basics of qualitative data analysis. In the interview portion of the session we will discuss the fundamentals of qualitative interviewing and participants will be taken through the steps of interviewing – from sample selection to the interview itself. In particular, we will explore the differences between qualitative interviewing and survey (structured) interviewing, interview question development, elicitation techniques (e.g., verbal and non-verbal cues), and question types. In the last hour of the session we will discuss the analysis of interview data and go through the steps in inductive data analysis including the coding of data, identification of patterns in data, and issues of validity and reliability. 

Target Audience: Ergonomists, OHS Personnel, Engineers

Facilitated by:  Shane Dixon, Human Factors Engineering Lab, Dept of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario

 

8. Introduction to human vibration

Date and Time: Monday, October 7, 2013,  - 1:00am to 5:00pm

Level: All Levels    Language: English

Workshop Outline

As ergonomists or safety practitioners, many of us probably have been asked whether a worker who is using power tools or driving a forklift truck is at risk to the vibrations that he or she is exposed. It is a well-known fact that vibrations have adverse health effects on human operators. How can we evaluate human vibration exposures? What are the relevant standards and guidelines related to human vibration exposures? What shall we do when we find out a worker is under excessive vibration exposures? How effective are some of the commonly recommended PPEs such as anti-vibration gloves in protecting workers using vibrating tools? These might be some of the common questions for many of our safety and health practitioners and ergonomists.

Human vibration exposures are often resulted from hand-held or hand-guided power tools (e.g. jack hammers, impact wrenches, and lawnmowers), and various motor vehicles (e.g. forklift trucks, backhoe loaders, and asphalt pavers). Vibrations are often transmitted to the human operators through the operators’ hands (the so-called hand-arm vibration, or HAV) or through the buttock and feet (the so-called whole-body vibration, or WBV).

This workshop aims at (1) providing participants with introductory information about how HAV and WBV exposures are transmitted to and throughout the body, (2) stating the adverse health associated with HAV and WBV exposures, (3) explaining how HAV and WBV exposures are measured and how they can be roughly estimated for practical purposes, (4) citing core components of relevant HAV and WBV standards, and (5) identifying possible ways to control or reduce HAV and WBV exposures.

Target Audience: This workshop is designed for ergonomists, kinesiologists, physical therapists and other safety practitioners who practice ergonomics in industrial settings where vibrating power tools and/or vehicles/equipment are of concerns. Managers who are responsible for health and safety in these settings will also find the workshop be informative. This workshop will be beneficial to students who plan to consider ergonomics as their future career as well.

Facilitated by: Stephen Bao, Ph.D., CCPE, CPE 


Pre-Conference Workshop Rates 

Please note that workshop fees are not included in the full conference registration fee.

All workshops include lunch served from 12pm to 1pm.

Full Day Workshop or Two Half Day Workshops: rate includes lunch served 12pm to 1pm.

All rates in $CDN

ACE Members

Non  Members & ACE Affiliates

Students

Early (by Sept 6, 2013)

$250.00

$299.00

$150.00

Late (after Sept 6,2013)

$287.50

$344.00

$172.50

Workshops that do not meet the minimum number of registrations by Sept. 6 will be cancelled. Please ensure that you register as soon as possible.

1/2 Day Workshop (am or pm): rate includes lunch served 12pm to 1pm.  

All rates in $CDN

ACE Members

Non Members  & ACE Affiliates

Students

Early (by Sept 6, 2013)

$150.00

$199.00

$100.00

Late (after Sept 6, 2013)

$172.50

$229.00

$115.00

Workshops that do not meet the minimum number of registrations by Sept. 6 will be cancelled. Please ensure that you register as soon as possible.

 

register on-line